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Oral Cancer Screening

Oral cancer is deadly, especially if diagnosed late where the survival rate is only 50%. And it does not only happen to people who smoke or drink alcohol. The percentage of oral cancer victims that smoke or use tobacco is declining and the population base that is getting diagnosed more is younger people, caused by specific strands of the human papilloma virus. Statistically, in the United States, one person will die every hour from oral cancer.

Early Detection


Because oral cancer can spread quickly, early detection is important. An oral cancer exam can identify early signs of this disease. The exam is quick and painless, and can be done during your regular dental check-up. Be sure to tell your Springwoods Village Dental if you notice persistent changes in your mouth or throat, such as sores, swelling, or numbness, or if you have difficulty eating or swallowing.

Jack Klugman talks about Oral Cancer?


 
  • Jack Klugman is an oral cancer survivor.
  • Each year over 30,000 american's will be diagnosed with oral cancer.
  • Of those 30,000 diagnosed, only half of them will be alive in 5 years.
  • Through an annual screening, your dentist can often catch oral cancer in its earliest, highly curable stages.
  • Early detection of oral cancer saves lives.
  • Jack Klugman is living proof.

Possible Signs & Symptoms of Oral Cancer


Contact Springwoods Village Dental if any of the following symptoms lasts for more than 2 weeks.
  • A sore, irritation, lump or thick patch in your mouth, lip, or throat
  • A white or red patch in your mouth
  • A feeling that something is caught in your throat
  • Difficulty chewing or swallowing
  • Difficulty moving your jaw or tongue
  • Numbness in your tongue or other areas of your mouth
  • Swelling of your jaw that causes dentures to fit poorly or become uncomfortable
  • Pain in one ear without hearing loss

Michael Douglas talks about Oral Cancer?


 
  • Michael Douglas is an oral cancer survivor.
  • Oral cancers are increasing in the US.
  • Most people know little about oral cancers.
  • Most people think it only impacts older people or smokers.
  • The fastest growing segment of people diagnosed with oral cancer is young adults who don't smoke.
  • A painless visual and tactile screening by your dentist can often identify early stage disease.
  • Finding oral cancer in early stages may save your life.

What Puts Someone at Risk?


Tobacco and alcohol use. Tobacco use of any kind, including cigarette smoking, puts you at risk. Heavy alcohol use also increases your chances of developing the disease. And using tobacco plus alcohol poses a much greater risk than using either substance alone.
HPV. Infection with the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (specifically the HPV 16 type) has been linked to a subset of oral cancers.
Age. Risk increases with age. Oral cancer most often occurs in people over the age of 40. Sun Exposure. Cancer of the lip can be caused by sun exposure. Diet. A diet low in fruits and vegetables may play a role in oral cancer development.
Sun Exposure. Cancer of the lip can be caused by sun exposure. Diet. A diet low in fruits and vegetables may play a role in oral cancer development.
Diet. A diet low in fruits and vegetables may play a role in oral cancer development.

How a Routine Dental Visit Saved My Life (Oral Cancer).


 
The fastest growing segment of people diagnosed with oral cancer is young adults who don't smoke.

Listen to Brooke's story:
  • Brook noticed white spots under her tongue.
  • She told her dentist during her exam.
  • Her Dr. recomended a biopsy to be safe.
  • A tumor was found.
  • Additional procedures occured.
  • Current scans have been clear.
  • Don't assume this can't be you.
  • Catching cancer early is the best route.

The Oral Cancer Exam


An oral cancer exam is painless and quick - it takes only a few minutes.
Your regular dental checkup is an excellent opportunity to have the exam.

Here’s what to expect:

1
Preparing for the exam: If you have dentures (plates) or partials, you will be asked to remove them.
2
Dr. Clark will inspect your face, neck, lips and mouth to look for any signs of cancer.
3
With both hands, Dr. Clark will feel the area under your jaw and the side of your neck, checking for lumps that may suggest cancer.
4
Dr. Clark will then look at and feel the insides of your lips and cheeks to check for possible signs of cancer, such as red and/or white patches.
5
Next, Dr. Clark will have you stick out your tongue so it can be checked for swelling or abnormal color or texture.
6
Using gauze, Dr. Clark will then gently pull your tongue to one side, then the other, to check the base of your tongue. The underside of your tongue will also be checked.
7
In addition, Dr. Clark will look at the roof and floor of your mouth, as well as the back of your throat.
7
Finally, Dr. Clark will put one finger on the floor of your mouth and, with the other hand under your chin, gently press down to check for lumps or sensitivity.

Top 5 Things to Know About Oral Cancer.


 
  • Oral cancer is less well-known that other cancers.
  • Listen to this video to learn about the top 5 things you must know about oral cancer.